Thursday, November 5, 2009

Do my incense-cedars work for Goldman Sachs?


Calocedrus decurrens (California incense-cedar) Photo: Walter Siegmund/Wikimedia

The vigorous determination. The fervent desire to tower over and control all within reach. As far as I know my incense-cedars didn't get any TARP money, but when it comes to the quest for world domination they're in the same league with Goldman Sachs.

Sure, the cedars always drop some tiny cones, but this year they're inundating the garden. The carpet of cones is so thick the ground is invisible. The dog can't step outside without getting cones wedged in her paws.

Rake them up? Tried that. They came back.

Cones cover the area formerly known as The Lawn, as if we went in for xeriscaping with colored rock. That's a look.

To be fair, the cedars are more generous than Goldman Sachs. They didn't muscle ahead of me in line for a Swine Flu shot.


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31 comments:

Debbie said...

I have the same problem here in southwestern CT with acorns. Last year we didn't have any and this year there are hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of them. Trying to rake them up doesn't work so my husband uses a blower to get them into a pile and then I use a snow shovel to shovel them into a garbage bag. Those suckers sure are heavy!

fairegarden said...

Oh how funny! A mulch of cones has a certain appeal, at least it would keep the foot traffic off the areas! Poor doggie though, that sounds painful in addition to being annoying. :-)
Frances

myenglishcountrygarden said...

LOL- well there you are, at least these cedars have some advantages over some manifestations of corporate greed ;-)

Janet said...

Almost sounds like Sweet Gum gumballs that we have around here!

Daffodil Planter said...

Debbie, We have a huge crop of acorns too and will implement your gathering tips this weekend. I even did some research to see if all this activity forecasts a harsh winter--it doesn't, luckily.

Frances, It's a pain for all concerned!

Julie, Yes, Wall Street goes Green!

Janet, Sweet Gums sound even more hazardous than cedars.

Anonymous said...

I wonder what the trees are telling us....

Daffodil Planter said...

Anon, My cedars are sending a pretty clear message, "You with the house, OUT! We were here first."

Michelle said...

I used to live with Deodar cedars. First the male cones would release tons of pollen - everything turned yellow. And then cones would start to fall, male and female, both a huge mess. Thank goodness I don't live within miles of any of those weeds now.

Daffodil Planter said...

MIchelle, Yes! We lived in Yellow World for a few weeks. Now the female cones are all over. Astonishing energy.

Susan Morrison said...

Your incense cedar should get together with my Brazillian Pepper. They can compete for the title of Messiest Tree Ever.

Daffodil Planter said...

Susan, Our trees are part of that great American arborial tradition described by Longfellow--"Under the shedding chestnut tree..."

Daffodil Planter said...

Arboreal, rather.

Daisy said...

My mother calls cones, pine and otherwise, "Tree Turds."

Daffodil Planter said...

Welcome Daisy! Now I really don't want to step on the cones....

joyce in sf said...

Does the WSJ have a gardening section? This is just great. I'm feeling that way about my potato vine, which above the deck is mostly dead, but scary tendrils are starting to shoot up through the gaps in the decking.

Daffodil Planter said...

Joyce, Nothing like a Fine Vine. I checked the WSJ and yes they do have garden stories--today's is about a Hamptons party. Plus ca change.

Grace Peterson said...

Hi DP~~ Don't you just hate that? I've got three gargantuan Sweet Gum trees that are constantly dropping seed pods [we've dubbed them THORN balls for obvious reasons]. Some things about nature really suck.

Garden Chick said...

Nature has her reasons for what she does. I struggle with acorns but the neighborhood squirrels love them so it's a good thing. We are really blessed, so I hear, because our squirrels are wonderful and not a nuisance at all!

Btw, I take advantage of the sweet gum trees at the park. I use the seed pods to cover the ground underneath my hostas. The slugs don't go near them!

Daffodil Planter said...

Grace, The natural world knows how to put a gardener in her place!

Daffodil Planter said...

Garden Chick, Brilliant use of sweet gum pods! I added you as a Colorado blog in the Rest of the West section of the blog roll. So that part of your move is done.

Jenny said...

My current home in NC is carpeted with ball bearings. Oops, meant to say acorns!

susie said...

But the sweet fragrance of the Incense Cedar...does it make it all worth it??

Daffodil Planter said...

Jenny, Ha! Roll 'em.

Susie, You make an excellent point. I take that marvelous fragrance for granted after so many years here in the mountains.

Steve said...

I love the smell of Incense Cedars. But of course I love the smell of dirt, too. I draw the line at transmission fluid and - let's face it - some of those Mollis Azaleas don't win Aroma Oscars. Odor discrimination is how we evolved into the elaborately aromatic species we are. I could go on........

joeltheurbangardener said...

Ha -great comparison! Glad I found your blog through Blotanical.

Cool Garden Things said...

Burn 'em!

VW said...

What a mess, DP! Less spiky than Janet's sweet gum balls (wow, love Garden Chick's tip for how to keep the slugs away with them), but still annoying. I wish I could think of something clever to do with your cedar cones, but I'm all out of ideas. Get out that rake again . . .

jodi (bloomingwriter) said...

Always a treat to drop in and get a chuckle at your posts. We don't have these plants in the far east of Canada, but I enjoyed the commentary and comparison all the same.

Pomona Belvedere said...

What about just leaving all those cones: instead of water-thirsty, hard-to-maintain lawn, you would then have sturdy groundcover.

Daffodil Planter said...

Welcome Steve! The cedars have a wonderful scent. Powerful trees in many ways.

Welcome Joel! Glad to have a Blotancial Brother here!

Welcome Cool Garden Things! Um, flames are not a viable alternative here in forest fire country.

Daffodil Planter said...

VW, You're right. The Rake's Progress.

Jodi, Thanks for visiting! Incense-cedars are beautiful trees, for all my fussing.

Pomona, But then I'd live in the Enchanted Forest and I'd have to wait for a team of garden bloggers to come with their swords and release me.