Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Beltane 2009

Mid-point between the Spring Equinox 
and the Summer Solstice.

21 comments:

Grace Peterson said...

DP~~ Interesting. I didn't know this. I had heard of Beltane but only in its mysticism and I've forgotten what all of that is about. Spring is rushing by so quickly!

Lovely iris. I bet the scent is pure heaven.

Daffodil Planter said...

Grace, I like these mid-points to remind me to take a breath and enjoy the season. We bought our house from a self-proclaimed "iris nut" and her collection has sharpened our appreciation.

EB said...

Ye-es, I suppose it is true that it's the mid-point; but to me thinking of it as May Day has a lot more resonance. Vague suggestions of going a-Maying; of may blossom (hawthorn); of singing to the sun in Oxford, and there always seems to be much more Going On in England from May onwards.

Janet said...

Good morning! Midway eh? Interesting. I do like the light and dark purple irises.

tina said...

Beautiful!

EB said...

2nd comment from me - greedily, sorry - I've just twigged that the irises are in your own garden. Wow! My two lost big irises are amongst my biggest regrets but they weren't happy with me. A lovely photo.

Daffodil Planter said...

Emily, Janet and Tina,

Thank you for visiting and Happy Beltane! Some mark the mid-point on May Day, and some look at May 5th through 7th. May baskets, Morris dancers, May poles, May weeding (oh, well that's not so much of a celebration, is it?)

Town Mouse said...

How did that happen? Time goes by so fast! Will you do a post on the traditional "blessing the fields" activities for Beltane?

Daffodil Planter said...

TM, Yes, the year is speeding along! I just mark the eight points in the year and don't know much about customs that go with those times. I think we need a wise European to write about that! Maybe a Town Mouse?

Pomona Belvedere said...

An emblematic Beltane picture, those irises. Some people count the cross-quarters not astronmomically or datewise but according to the signs of nature: when the hawthorn's out (above) or in our case, maybe it's fully-leafed-out oaks and irises!

Daffodil Planter said...

Pomona, Yes, signs from nature too!

That reminds me of the post you wrote about local planting times, and the marker in our county was when the blackberries bloom.

The turning wheel of the year, however we choose to note the changes.

I'll be thinking of all my gardening friends today, as I mark Beltane.

peoniesinthesnow said...

Stunning iris! Beltane, what a great thought it brings out the wild. Full moon in two days.

peoniesinthesnow said...

Stunning iris! Beltane what a lovely thought, it brings out the wild and thoughts of dancing under the full moon two days away.

SusanGardenChick said...

Thanks to you, yesterday I learned that apian is a fancy word for bees, and now I know what Beltane means.

Normally you would be expecting me to follow this up with a snarky comment about Word A Day toilet paper or something, but we are rather vocabulary obsessed around here, and actually turned our family room's media nook into a built-in bookshelf, in part so we always have a dictionary in easy reach downstairs.

Speaking of which, I'm heading there now to casually strike up a Beltane conversation so I can show off my new knowledge.

Daffodil Planter said...

Susan, You can suggest a dance under the full moon to celebrate Beltane--a custom I just learned from PeoniesintheSnow.

ryan said...

I had never heard of this. I'm not sure how that happened. I mean, who educated me, where were their priorities? I suppose I shouldn't blame other people, just myself.

Daffodil Planter said...

Ryan, Cross-quarter days are little known, and their names count as archaic vocabulary. Good for gardeners and Scrabble hounds.

Margaret Roach said...

I am laughing about being characterized about "not kidding" about 4 seasons. That's for sure. I love my cold months as much as my warm; 365 days there is a garden here out my window, even when I am not inclined to step out into it.

Daffodil Planter said...

Welcome Margaret! Thank you for visiting! You northern gardeners have nerves of steel and endless optimism.

Hortoris said...

Knock knock - who's there?

Iris

Iris who

Iristyew in the name of the law

This may not travel to USA as it hasn't got a plant passport

Daffodil Planter said...

Welcome Hortoris! Cute joke--and it passed safely through California agricultural inspection, after a brief concern that it was infested with puns.